Of Course
Of Course
+
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 2: Boston at Miami
You won’t find a more evenly matched set of teams in a single game for the rest of the playoffs. Both teams had 42 rebounds. Both teams had only 8 turnovers—in an overtime game. The only difference that helped keep Miami even with a seminal performance from Rajon Rondo was the free throw discrepancy.
Boston committed 33 fouls to Miami’s 18. The Heat shot 47 free throws to the Celtics 29 (fortunately for the Celtics, the Heat only converted 31 of those 47 free throws; that’s Tiago Splitter territory). Greg Stiemsma had 4 fouls in 3 minutes before Doc just sat him on the bench and forgot about him. Paul Pierce fouled out; Mickael Pietrus fouled out; Keyon Dooling fouled out; Garnett had 4 fouls and Rondo 3. About the only guys on Boston not getting called for fouls were Ray Allen and Brandon Bass.
To give you another idea of the free throw discrepancy, LeBron James finished with 34 points on 7 for 20 shooting. He took 24 free throws (making 18 of them). To give you a comparison the most free throws taken in a single game during these playoffs before tonight, was Kobe Bryant’s perfect 18 for 18 against Denver. LeBron took 6 more than Kobe did.
The referees were very diligent making calls for the Heat, but they failed to make a big one with the scored tied and 1:35 left in overtime. Rondo drove the lane and got bonked on the head by Wade. Rondo hit the court (rightfully) complaining about the hit, but Miami was heading the other way and they quickly scored on a rat-a-tat-tat set of passes eventually finding Haslem to gain the lead 107-105.
When Boston got the ball back, Kevin Garnett—visibly exhausted—had his pass intercepted by Mario Chalmers (who had 22 huge points for Miami while Wade was struggling with his shot for most of the game) and it was Heat ball up 2 with 1:16 to play.
Wade held the ball at the top of the key, and LeBron came out to set a screen for him. Because it was LeBron, the Celtics couldn’t overplay the screen like they’d normally do to run two defenders at Wade and force the ball out of his hands, so Wade split them and drove the lane. Again, the refereeing came into question because when Wade made his final jump towards the basket, he extended his leg to make contact with Garnett (this is most memorably exemplified by Reggie Miller, when he would kick his legs after a jumper to try and draw the foul). Jeff Van Gundy very astutely pointed out how easily the call could have gone against Wade. It’s unclear in replays whether Wade initiated the contact or Garnett, but Garnett was called for the foul. And, oh yeah, Wade made his the lay-in for a 3-point play to extend the Heat’s lead to 5 with under a minute to play. Here’s a gif of the play, so you can be the judge.

Personally, I have no idea who is at fault. It’s really hard to tell whether Garnett hit Wade’s face/arm first or Wade’s foot kicked him. Regardless, the Heat took a 5-point lead into the final minute. Boston dicked around on their next possession and Garnett was forced to throw up a desperation 3 as the shot clock expired. It missed and it was Heat ball again. Instead of fouling, the Celtics let the ball get down into their end as percious seconda ticked off the clock. Doc was imploring them to foul, but at that point it was pointless. Battier missed a 3, but LeBron got another offensive rebound and passed to Wade who was fouled.
As I mentioned earlier about Rondo, he did hit 2 3-pointers in the final 14 seconds to make Wade sweat on his final set of free throws, especially since Rondo had cut the Heat lead to 3, and Wade missed the first one. He made the second and it was over. Heat victory. 
Rondo spoke after the game about his incredible performance (via NBA Offseason):

“It’s kind of irrelevant. We lost. Simple as that.”

God, that just makes me love him even more. He doesn’t give a shit about how he played. “We lost, simple as that”; pithy fuckin’ genius. 
If you wonder why I’ve excitedly talked with my old man about a possible Spurs-Celtics NBA Finals (something exactly 2 people in the whole world want: me and my old man), it’s because of quotes like that one from Rondo. At the end of the day, it’s not about anything but winning (Popovich and Duncan know this as well). I just wish the refs had given Boston a better chance tonight.
Back to Boston for game 3.  
Final: MIAMI HEAT 115 - Boston Celtics 111 in OT
The Heat lead the series 2-0
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cbssports:

Nets guard DeShawn Stevenson has an ATM in his kitchen.
Even better, he apparently charges his friends a $4.50 service fee to use it.
Photo via Instagram
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fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
fuckyeanba:

Game 4: Miami at Boston
It’s hard to wrap your head around what manner of play could have facilitated an overtime session where the leading scorers for both teams have fouled out. It’s so rare you don’t even think about the possibility until you realize both players have 5 fouls and we’re headed towards an extra 5 minutes of action. Then, one gets whistled for an offensive foul and about a minute later, the same thing happens to the other; since both fouls occurred away from the ball, you could even guess at a conspiracy, if you’re one of those people that believe in such things. I am not.  So lets put the Paul Pierce and LeBron James overtime fouls out of the way. They’re useless in describing what happened, even as they’re part of the ending. 
The Celtics came out smoking, taking an 11 point lead in the 1st quarter and adding 4 more to that advantage by half-time. Keyon Dooling was hitting corner 3’s like he was back at the University of Missouri. Paul Pierce scored 12 points in the 1st quarter, and Rajon Rondo was the piston driving the engine.

Rondo was plugged in from the very beginning. After Garnett won the opening toss and the ball was headed towards Rondo in the Celtics’ back-court, he knocked the ball with his head up into the air before letting it fall into step with a dribble up-court to start the game. This sort of soccer display is par for the course when it’s Steve Nash, but when it’s the cerebral Rondo, you know he’s ready, and so were the Celtics. 

Everyone knew the Heat were coming back though; and it only helped matters when Ja Ratasfari Ra-jon decided to take a conspicuous dig at the Heat during his halftime interview with Doris Burke. When she asked him what holes the Celtics were exploiting on their way to 61 first half points, Rondo replied, without a flutter of irony:

“Um, them complaining and crying to the referees and transition.”

So, yeah, you can be sure that got back to the Heat crew, as Wade could be shown yammering with Rajon later in the second half.
Dwyane Wade has made it his habit to let LeBron control the ball in the opening half, before he starts exploding to the bucket in the second. I’m pretty sure he doesn’t even warm up; preferring to let the first couple quarters take the place of some routine practice jumpers before the game. It works for the second half, but if you’re a Heat fan, you wish he’d get going just a few hours earlier.
The Heat came back on the strength of their defense combined with the woeful way the Celtics scored the ball in the second half. The Celtics only managed 28 points COMBINED in the second half. That doesn’t mean the Celtics didn’t score. Oh, they had to if they were going to even force an overtime, its just the scoring was so limited, the Heat didn’t even need a big run to get back into it—they just chipped away and by the 4th quarter they were only down 5. With 8:53 remaining in the game, a LeBron James lay-in tied the score at 74 and the Garden crowd sounded like a Wake, complete with sad drinking.
After tying the score, the game turned into a battle of wills, with neither team getting head by more than 3. Meanwhile, Rondo continued his extraterristrial play. 

In the final seconds of regulation, LeBron passed out of a double team and Udonis Haslem—he was his usual stout, best with 17 rebounds and enough glares to give Boston kids nightmares for a month—forced a shot to beat the clock that drew nothing but air.
The overtime saw the aforementioned 6th fouls on Pierce and ‘Bron, but it was Rondo that saved the day. He’s been so good in this series, it’s not crazy to think he’s the best single player of these playoffs. He had 15 assists and the last 3 points of overtime. Dwyane Wade had a chance to get the out-right win with a 3-pointer at the buzzer, and as every ESPN analyst said after the game, he should have jumped into Mickael Pietrus, rather than take the wide open 3 that missed.
LeBron watched from the sideline, and his downcast gaze mirrored all the Heat fans and players as they realized this wasn’t going to be as easy as they all thought.

Not only that, but Rajon Rondo is an alien, and the earthlings still haven’t figured out how to slow him down. Game 5 back in Miami is gonna be a doozy.
Final: BOSTON CELTICS 93 - Miami Heat 91
The Celtics and Heat are tied 2-2
PHOTOS VIA
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cbssports:

FINAL: Thunder 108, Spurs 103
“That’s how this Thunder team does it…guts, grit, and toughness.”
20 consecutive wins for the Spurs…and now three straight losses.
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sexontoothpicklegs:

Binki Shapiro - W Magazine (June 2012)
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flarefashion:


Brooklyn Decker - June 2012 / Fashion Director: Elizabeth Cabral / Art Director: Tanya Watt / Photographer: Max Abadian 


Go on-set with Brooklyn for her first Canadian cover shoot with FLARE.
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Marilyn photographed on the set of There’s No Business Like Show Business, 1954
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